Lacto-fermented Carrots & Kombu

Hello,

Have you tried pickling carrots before? If not, you really should give it a try (check out our lacto-fermenting overview if you are a beginner). It’s easy and the carrots have a great sweet/sour balance. I added kombu, an edible type of kelp, to this batch to an extra layer of flavor. Kombu is traditionally used to make dashi, which is the broth base for most miso soups, but it can used in any number of other dishes, too. As an added bonus, kombu keeps well for long periods of time, making it an ideal pantry staple to keep on hand. It doesn’t hurt that it is a nutritional powerhouse as well.

Enjoy!

Lacto-fermented Carrots & Kombu
makes a pint

Recipe note: I used the small carrots from last weeks share, which were only 2 to 3 inches long. It took roughly 40 of these small carrots to get 2/3 pound whereas you might only need 3 or 4 large carrots to equal this weight.

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 pound carrots, trimmed and cut 1/4″ thick on the diagonal
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 ounce (about 3/4 tablespoon) sea salt
  • 3 pieces of kombu (roughly 2×3″), cut into 1/2″ strips

Directions:

  • Place carrots in a 1.5 pint jar.
  • Place 1 cup of water along with the salt in a small saucepan. Cover and bring to a simmer over medium heat, making sure the salt has dissolved. Remove from heat and add the kombu (it should soften within a minute or so). Add 1 cup of cold water and allow the mixture to cool to room temperature. Pour over the carrots and ensure they are submerged (we love the KrautSource fermenting lid but you can also weigh them down with a cabbage leaf). Cover and allow to sit at room temperature. Taste daily to determine when they are “done”.

Weekly Farm Notes :: June 15th, 2016

Hello,

If you received a text message earlier, you can expect a share for the CSA extension this week. If not, stop by anyways to pick up some veggies and say hi!

This week, Alice shares some of her favorite resources for clean eating (thanks for including us in your article, Alice!). Check out the list and then let her know if you have anything to add!

See you at market!

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June 15th Produce

Here are the items you can expect at Market {M} and in the CSA {CSA}:

  • Swiss Chard {M/CSA}: the only way to eat soup in this heat is if it’s chilled. This Chilled Swiss Chard Soup was eye-opening the first time I made it and I continue to make it every summer.
  • Romaine & Green Leaf Lettuce {M/CSA}: I love bowl type meals, piled high with lots of different flavors and textures. This post, which includes a recipe for crunchy roasted chickpeas, breaks down the different elements that make a great vegan bowl meal.
  • Green Beans {CSA}: I saw a lovely recipe of green beans, bulgur, walnuts, mint all mixed with a tahini sauce. It is on my list of recipes to try but I encourage you to experiment if it sounds good to you too!
  • Carrots {CSA}: I have always loved pickles and carrots separately but luckily I know enough now to combine the two flavors. Try Lacto-Fermented Carrot Sticks for a sweet/sour treat!
  • Green Onions {CSA}: the newest market recipe – Zucchini & Herbed Ricotta Tartines – incorporates green onions into the ricotta mixture. If you don’t pick up a zucchini at market, you can use the same ricotta mixture with our cherry tomatoes for a quick and delicious meal!
  • Cabbage {CSA}: I haven’t tried this myself but I have charred cabbage in the skillet, and I can tell you the results were wonderful. If you already have the grill fired up, why not try this Grilled Cabbage recipe?
  • Red & Yellow Cherry Tomatoes {CSA}: it’s been quite a while since I linked to any tomato recipes on here, but here is one of my favorite – Cherry Tomato Gazpacho. We might not have enough to make this full recipe but supplement with some others from the market (and support other farms in the process!).
  • Herbs {M}: the herbs this week include basil, parsley, mint and lemon balm. I think all of these would be a great addition to these Seared Tofu Bahn Mi Sandwiches.

Weekly Farm Notes :: May 11th, 2016

Hello,

We have a couple new items at market this week: carrots, escarole and beet greens! See below for more information and tasty ways to use these items.

Alice O’Dea is following up her post on 2 ingredients cookies with 2 ingredient pizza crust! Making homemade pizza is delicious but I am often dissuaded by making the crust. Now I don’t have any excuses.

See you tomorrow at market!

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May 11th Produce

Here are the items you can expect at Market {M} and in the CSA {CSA}:

  • Sweet Baby Carrots {M/CSA}: if you are interested in lacto-fermenting but aren’t sure where to start, read through our recent post with tips and tricks to help you get started. Once you have the basics down, give these recipes a try: Carrot, Radish & Apple Ferment and Purslane & Carrot Ferment.
  • Ford Hook & Rainbow Swiss Chard {M/CSA}: since you are saving so much time on the crust, why not spend a little extra and make caramelized onions for this Pizza with Caramelized Onions, Ricotta and Chard recipe.
  • Siberian & Red Kale Mix {M/CSA}: I love this Easy White Bean and Kale Hummus. It’s a fun change from chickpea based hummus and a recipe I come back to over and over.
  • Tender Collards {M/CSA}: have you ever put collard greens in a smoothie? I haven’t tried it as I always think they need to be cooked to death. Why not try it with this Banana Orange Collard Green Smoothie?
  • Natacha Escarole {M/CSA}: aren’t familiar with escarole? Not to worry – it is versatile and can be used both raw and in cooked applications. Here is a good place to start.
  • Red Leaf Lettuce {M/CSA}: a salad is something I think one should be able to put together without a recipe. Check out our post on The Essential Elements to a Satisfying Salad to find out where to start.
  • Scarlet Salad Turnips {CSA}: I rarely using canning as a preservation method as I find so many other options that are easier. I think this recipe for Lemon-Pickled Turnips would work just as well as a quick pickle.
  • Red Kitten Spinach {M}: unless you have been hiding under a rock, you know that spinach is good for you food. But did you know it is this good for you? Seriously, we all need to eat more!
  • Beet Greens {M}: these greens can be used in so many ways, but I love the suggestions on this post: barley salad with lemon, goat cheese and scallions; mixed with ricotta to make a beet green crostini; and stir-fried and served with rice and a fried egg.
  • Edible Mild & Spicy Asian Flowers {M}: one of our loyal patrons, Jerri, posted a picture of lettuce cups topped with our edible flowers. She filled Bibb lettuce with kamut, edamame, corn, fresh herbs & the flowers and topped it with a kale tahini lime sauce. Yum!
  • Peppermint {M}: lemon and mint seem like a natural pairing, not to mention perfect flavors for spring and summer. Why not turn your mint into a Lemon-Mint Vinaigrette to use with all of the salad greens?


Vegetable Packed Pancakes

Hello,

Turning traditionally sweet food into something savory is nothing new. Of course there is Zucchini Bread and Carrot Cake but the vegetable additions are usually masked by lots of sugar and sweet spices. Nowadays, you can find items like Corn & Basil Cupcakes, Rosemary, Almond and Parmesan Cookies, and even our Savory Quick Bread with Broccoli Rabe and Sun-dried Tomatoes, which keep the basic shape of the original item but lacks most or all of the sweetness.

This is my take on a Buckwheat Vegetable Pancake recipe from Fresh Food Fast (one of my favorite cookbooks), which looks like a pancake but is served as a savory side dish. The author uses cabbage where I use kale but I think a number of vegetables would work well. These are great because you can flavor them in any number of ways – I added a few dashes of a Turkish spice blend but I think curry powder or Italian seasoning would be great too. You could also skip the spices and just add fresh herbs, like dill or parsley.

I didn’t try it, but you might be able to make this vegan by swapping the eggs for flax or chia eggs and using a plant based milk. Let me know how it turns out if you try it!

Also, if you want a dipping sauce to serve along side, try this spicy yogurt sauce: mix together 1 cup whole-milk yogurt, a couple tablespoons chopped cilantro, 1 small minced garlic clove, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon (or more as desired) cayenne.

Vegetable Packed Pancakes
makes about 10 3″ pancakes

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup gluten-free flour of choice (I used 1/4 cup buckwheat + 1/4 cup brown rice flour but you could also use more all-purpose)
  • 1-1/4 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1-1/2 cups milk (I used soy milk but use whatever you have on hand)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1-1/2 cups finely chopped kale
  • 1 large carrot, grated on the medium holes of a box grater, about 3/4 cup
  • 3 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Spices / herbs of choice, optional
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil for frying

Directions:

  • In a large bowl, whisk together the flours, salt and baking powder. In a separate bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, and oil. Pour the wet mixture over the dry and stir to combine.
  • Add the kale, carrots, scallions and spices / herbs, if using, to the batter and mix well. The batter will be thick.
  • Heat a tablespoon of oil over medium heat in a 12″ non-stick skillet until shimmering. Using a 1/3 cup dry measure, add three scoops of batter to the pan. Cook until the first side is spotty brown and there are bubbles around the edge, about 3-5 minutes. Flip and cook until the second side is spotty brown and the pancakes are cooked through, another few minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and cook the remaining batter.
  • To keep all pancakes warm while working in batches, you can place the cooling rack inside a rimmed baking sheet and transfer to a 200 degree oven.

Easy Kale Salad with Russian Dressing

Hi!

Here is a kale salad that is tasty, quick to prepare and can be kept in the refrigerator for days without wilting (you can’t say that about many dressed salads!). It is flavorful enough to eat on its own or you can add any number of items – tofu, beans, hard boiled eggs, cheese, more veggies – and make it the base to a full meal. Check out our Essentials for a Satisfying Salad post for more ideas.

Enjoy!

Easy Kale Salad with Russian Dressing
makes about 4 side dish servings or 2 main dish servings

Recipe note: 1) I would consider this a lightly dressed salad. I think it is just enough to evenly coat the greens and add flavor without weighing them down. Increase the dressing ingredients by 50% if you like a lot of dressing or are planning to add more ingredients; 2) I used a mix of sweet pickle and pickled garlic juice but I think just about any pickle or fermented vegetable juice could work well – add a little at a time and taste as you go; 3) if you don’t have scallions, use finely chopped shallot, onion or a little minced garlic; 4) this was adapted from the Maximum Flavor cookbook.

Ingredients:

  • 6 ounces (about 30 small leaves) of Toscano kale, destemmed and thinly sliced
  • 1 large carrot, grated on the large holes of a box grater
  • 2 tablespoons mayo
  • 2 tablespoons ketchup
  • 2 tablespoons pickle juice (see recipe note)
  • 1 scallion, white and light green parts, finely chopped (see recipe note)
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried horseradish or fresh horseradish to taste
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Directions:

  • Add the kale and carrots to a medium mixing bowl.
  • Whisk the remaining ingredients together in a small mixing bowl until combined. Dip a piece of kale into the mix and taste for seasoning. Adjust as needed.
  • Pour the dressing over the kale and massage the greens for about a minute, or until they are slightly wilted and softened. Refrigerate for a few hours before serving.

Weekly Farm Notes :: Nov 24th, 2015

Hello!

Is everyone ready for Thanksgiving? If you waiting until the last minute to figure out your meal, we hope you find some ideas below. Also, don’t forget that the end of the “Fall into Greens” CSA session is ending soon so preserve the bounty now!

A reminder: all of those stems from your greens are edible! Adding them to smoothies is always an option but I like the ideas on this post. Also, look for a “Stem Jam” recipe coming soon!

See you at market tomorrow (not Wednesday) and HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

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November 24th Produce

Here are the items you can expect at Market (denoted by M) and/or in the CSA (denoted by CSA):

  • Carrots {M/CSA}: check out our latest post – Carrot and Turmeric Soup! This would be an easy, make-ahead side dish if you are still planning your Thanksgiving meal. Also, don’t forget that you can eat the carrot tops!
  • Jerusalem Artichokes {M/CSA}: there is one important thing to know about the composition of Jerusalem artichokes – they are rich in a carbohydrate called inulin and very low in starch. This makes them great for those who wish to avoid starchy foods but they can also be difficult to digest in large quantities. Check out this, this and this for more information.
  • Siberian Kale Mix {M/CSA}: how genius is this “Salad Booster” – a combination of toasted nori, kale, sunflower seeds and lemon zest?! This is definitely on my list of things to try ASAP!
  • Red Leaf & Red Butter Lettuce {M/CSA}: how do you store your lettuce? This link tells you how to keep your greens fresher, longer!
  • Ford Hook Swiss Chard {M/CSA}: kale gets all the attention but Swiss chard deserves some of the lime light! Check out this link for lots of recipe ideas – I especially like the sound of Bread Soup with Onions, Chard and Mushrooms for Thanksgiving.
  • Awesome Asian Salad Mix {M/CSA}: there are LOTS of Asian salad recipes out there but I think this one looks the best (no crispy ramen topping included, which is a good thing in my book). Just substitute the salad mix for the kale.
  • Pak Choi {CSA}: if you need something on the lighter side post Thanksgiving, give our Triple Sesame Noodles with Pak Choi a try!
  • Garlic {CSA}: I just got The Joy of Pickling cookbook and wow, it’s fantastic. If you are a fan of pickling, I would suggest you pick up a copy (I got mine for $6 on Ebay). See the Chinese Pickled Garlic recipe below for a fast and flavorful way to preserve your garlic.
  • Tender Collards {M}: these Chickpea, Cashew and Collard Green Patties can be made ahead and frozen. No need for greasy carry out when you have these stashed away in the freezer!
  • Spicy Large Leaf Arugula {M}: I am fascinated by another cookbook I picked up this week – Preserving the Japanese Way. There is a recipe for Wild Arugula with Walnut Miso that I am dying to try. If it turns out well, I will definitely post it soon!
  • Spicy Asian Mustard Greens {M}: hot damn, this vegan Mustard Greens Soup with Poblanos and Almonds sounds delicious! I love how simple ingredients can come together to make a special meal.

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Recipe :: Chinese Pickled Garlic

This recipe is from The Joy of Pickling and makes about 1 cup.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup rice vinegar, white wine vinegar or distilled vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon pickling salt

Directions:

  • Put the garlic into a half-pint jar. Stir together the vinegar, sugar and salt and pour the liquid over the garlic. Cap the jar and store it in the refrigerator or another cool, dark place for at least 1 month before using the garlic. It should keep well for 1 year or more. After opening the jar, store it in the refrigerator.

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Alice O’Dea Article

Have you read Alice O’Dea’s recent article? Take her advice and make a yummy soup from your Thanksgiving leftovers!

 


Carrot & Turmeric Soup

Hello,

Making this soup is a lesson in balancing fresh and cooked flavor and seasoning based on taste. The base of the soup – onion, turmeric, carrots, coconut milk – would make a nice soup by itself, but it is definitely kicked up a notch by adding fresh flavors at the end. I like to incorporate fresh versions of ingredients cooked in the soup, like the carrots and turmeric. It helps to intensify both of those flavors and brightens up the dish. I then added two additional ingredients that I think almost every dish needs at the end – a little acidity and a little sweetness (a lot of dishes need extra salt too but I added plenty in the beginning). I chose apple cider vinegar and honey as I think they pair nicely with the other flavors but you can play around and try what you like (lemon juice or white wine vinegar in place of the apple cider vinegar and maple syrup or sorghum in place of the honey might be nice). Whichever route you decide to take, just taste, make small adjustments, and taste again. Enjoy!

Carrot & Turmeric Soup
makes about 4 servings for a main dish, 6 for a side dish

Recipe notes: 1) I found fresh turmeric at the farmers market a couple of weeks ago so have been using that over dried. If you don’t have access to fresh, use 1 teaspoon dried turmeric instead and add it all in the beginning with the garlic; 2) I preferred this soup the day after making it as the flavors had time to really blend and smooth out, but it was still very good the day of.

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 1 teaspoon table salt
  • 3 teaspoons grated fresh turmeric, divided
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic (from about 2 medium cloves)
  • 1-1/8 pound (about 6 medium) trimmed carrots, chopped into 1/2″ pieces, divided
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 3-4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • To serve: croutons and/or chives

Directions:

  • Heat oil over medium heat in a medium saucepan until shimmering. Add onion and salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent and just starting to brown, about 5-7 minutes. Add 2 teaspoons turmeric and garlic and stir frequently for 1 minute. Add 1 pound of carrots, water and coconut milk and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes or until the carrots are tender. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. Transfer to a blender and add the remaining turmeric and carrots, 3 teaspoons apple cider vinegar and honey and puree until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.