Black Bean and Radish Green Dip

Hello,

Wondering what to do with your radish and salad turnip greens? This is a quick and easy recipe that will help you use your greens. You can definitely use other types of greens here but I love the extra spiciness that radish greens provide.

One note of caution – this dip is not pretty! It’s kind of a grey and army green color once it’s pureed, which doesn’t bother me, but I wouldn’t necessarily serve this at a dinner party ūüôā You could substitute the black beans for white beans and change up the spicing and it would probably be a bit more appetizing to the eye.

You can use this like you would hummus – use it as a dip for raw veggies or bread or as a smear on sandwiches or a veggie wrap. Play around and have fun!

Black Bean and Radish Green Dip
makes about 1-1/2 cups

Recipe notes: feel free to substitute other greens, such as kale, collards, or Swiss chard, for the radish / salad turnip greens.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 packed cup cooked radish / salad turnip greens (from about 8 large radishes / salad turnips)
  • 1/2 loosely packed cup cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Directions:

  • Place all ingredients in a large capacity food processor and process until a smooth paste forms, about 1 minutes, stopping to scrap down the sides as necessary. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.

Weekly Farm Notes :: Sep 30th, 2015

Hello!

Just to rehash from last week, we have new information on the website:

  • If you can’t remember what is what after you get home, check out our¬†produce pictures and detailed information¬†tab for pictures of each individual item in your CSA basket. We are still working to update this information so check back each week.
  • We added a tab that will allow you to easily search our recipes. Wondering what you can do with your greens? Check out this tab for constantly updated ideas!

See you at market!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

September 30th Produce

Here are the items you can expect at Market (denoted by M) and/or in the CSA (denoted by CSA):

  • Awesome Asian Mix {CSA}: wow, check out this mix – you get Yukina Savoy, Tokyo Bekana, Ruby Streaks, Red Komatsuna, and Suehihung Mustard! You can either eat it raw in a salad or saute it.
  • Broccoli Rabe {CSA}: I found a recipe for sauteed broccoli rabe, blue cheese and bacon pizzas that looked really interesting. Swap out the bacon for mushrooms for a vegetarian version.
  • Hakurei and Red Scarlet Salad Turnips {M/CSA}: why not combine the turnips AND the greens in the next salad you make? Here is a recipe for a turnip green salad with a sweeter dressing to help balance any spiciness or bitterness from the greens (check out our salad post for lots of great salad making tips!).
  • Radishes and Greens {M/CSA}: wondering what to do with all those lovely radish greens? Make a pesto of course!
  • Toscano and Siberian Kale {M/CSA}: this is one of my all time favorite fast foods. Try it with different greens and even different types of grains.
  • Pak Choi {M/CSA}: to prepare pak choi, separate the greens from the stems, slice and wash. I suggest sauteing the stems over medium-high heat for a couple minutes on one side or until browned. Flip and allow the other side to cook for a minute before adding the greens. They will cook very fast so just flip them around for a minute and serve. I served mine with sesame noodles – look for that recipe soon!
  • Spicy Mustard Greens {M/CSA}: I am planning to saute these greens and add them to a homemade hummus recipe. I will share the recipe with you if it turns out well!
  • Collard Greens {M}: there are lots of recipes for collard green and white bean soup so it must be good! Here is one such post but I bet you can make it or something similar by following our soup making tips.
  • Summerfest Komatsuna {M}: these greens work great in smoothies given their mild flavor profile. Try it in your favorite smoothie recipe and let us know what you think!
  • Daikon Radish and Greens {M}: did you know daikon radishes are one of the main ingredients to kimchi? If you don’t have the time or experience to start a fermentation, why not try quick pickling them? Follow our¬†Quick Pickled Okra post and just swap out okra for daikon.


Weekly Farm Notes :: Sep 23rd, 2015

Hello!

We are in the process of adding more information to our website that we think you will find useful. First, we have added a tab with produce pictures and detailed information, including storage tips, nutrition and recipe links. Second, we added a tab that will allow you to easily search our recipes. Both tabs are a work in process so please check back weekly for updated information. Please let us know if you are looking for additional information and we would be happy to include it!

See you at market!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

September 23rd Produce

Here are the items you can expect at Market (denoted by M) and/or in the CSA (denoted by CSA):

  • Summerfest Komatsuna {CSA}: I simply chopped this up last week and added it to a basic miso soup recipe (along with some brown rice to make it a complete meal). This recipe takes just 15 minutes!
  • Swiss Chard {CSA}: this is my kind of recipe – protein, veggies and cheese in one bowl makes my heart happy.
  • Snap Green Beans {CSA}: do you ever have left over cornbread that gets a bit dry? I had some last week that I crumbled and sauteed in butter until brown and crispy. I sprinkled the cornbread crumbles over steamed green beans for a tasty side dish.
  • Hakurei Salad Turnips {CSA}: we roasted our salad turnips and radishes last week and added them to a simple barley salad. Check out our recipe here!
  • Collard Greens {M/CSA}: I am thinking ahead to cooler weather and the holidays and this¬†Collard Green Gratin sounds like something I should try soon.
  • Royal Radishes and Greens {M/CSA}:¬†we roasted our salad turnips and radishes last week and added them to a simple barley salad. Check out our recipe here!
  • Siberian Kale {M/CSA}: we are big smoothie fans here at Tant Hill! We love adding greens to our smoothies and kale is the perfect option. Check out our Pinterest page where we have gathered some recipes from around the web.
  • Pak Choi {M/CSA}: check out our quick, delicious recipe for Raw Spicy Pak Choi Salad. Serve this along side one of my favorite weeknight dinners of rice topped with a fried egg. It’s the best type of fast food.
  • Okra {M}: we have a couple okra recipes on the website for you to try – Quick Pickled Okra and Fresh Okra Cakes. I am also experimenting with dehydrating okra this week and will report back!
  • Arugula {M}: umm, why haven’t I made this salad before?! It’s a great use for your radishes too.
  • Spicy Asian Greens {M}: these greens deserve a great dressing. Check out the dressing section of our Essential Elements to a Satisfying Salad post and easily make your own!
  • Yukina Savoy {M}: this green looks like tatsoi but actually belongs to the Brassica family along with cabbage, broccoli and kale. You can use it any way that you would use spinach but here is a simple recipe for Mushrooms and Yukina Savoy if you need some inspiration.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Other :: Alice O’Dea Article

Have you read Alice O’Dea’s latest article? This week she discusses making a roux – an essential element for many sauces and stews. Learn this now and use it all Fall and Winter long!


Roasted Radish and Salad Turnip with Barley Salad

Hello!

Just a quick recipe for roasted radishes and salad turnips. I had only eaten them raw until very recently and I like the change that roasting brings. I tossed mine with a simple barley salad but you could just serve these as a side dish on their own.

If you do serve these with the barley salad, I would suggest checking out our salad post here for some tips and tricks to building a salad. In that post, I described the elements I think are essential for a great salad, and they apply here too.

  • Both raw (radish / salad turnip greens) and cooked (radishes / salad turnips ) textures
  • Hits on most of the 5 basic flavors ‚Äď bitter¬†(radishes),¬†sweet (sherry vinegar & honey dressing),¬†sour (sherry vinegar and honey dressing), salty (Parmesan cheese), umami (Parmesan cheese)
  • Ample amount of protein (not a lot in this salad but the cheese does offer some)
  • Cohesive dressing¬†(sherry vinegar & honey dressing)

Give this technique a try and let us know what you think!

Roasted Radish & Salad Turnips with Barley Salad
4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup pearled barley, rinsed to remove excess starch
  • Vegetable oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3-4 large radishes, greens removed and reserved, stem end removed, and sliced in quarters
  • 3-4 large salad turnips,¬†greens removed and reserved, stem end removed, and sliced in quarters
  • 1 teaspoon minced shallot (from about 1 small shallot)
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Shaved Parmesan and thinly sliced reserved greens for serving

Directions:

  • For the barley: Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and set aside.¬†In a medium saucepan with a tight fitting lid, bring 3 cups of water and a big pinch of salt to a boil. Add the rinsed barley and a drizzle of vegetable oil (to reduce foaming) and return to a simmer. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and the water is absorbed, about 35-40 minutes. Spread out evenly on the rimmed baking sheet and allow to cool (this will ensure the grains don’t clump up and stick together).
  • For the radishes and salad turnips: adjust oven rack to the middle position and preheat to 450 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and set aside. Toss prepared radishes and salad turnips with about 1-2 teaspoons vegetable oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Spread evenly on the rimmed baking sheet and roast on the middle rack until the first side in golden brown, about 15 minutes. Flip and roast on the other side until golden brown, about another 10 minutes. Test doneness with a paring knife and set aside.
  • For salad: whisk together the shallots, honey, sherry vinegar, olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. Toss dressing with barley and roasted vegetables in large serving bowl. Top with thinly sliced greens and Parmesan and serve.

Weekly Farm Notes :: Sep 16th, 2015

Hello!

The CSA starts tomorrow…are you as excited as I am?! So many tasty things to look forward to cooking over the next week. And if you haven’t signed up yet, there are a few spots left! Contact us here to find out more.

Although we haven’t had much at market the past few weeks, we have been busy on the farm and online in this space getting ready for this upcoming growing season. We have posted both an Essentials to Making Soup and an Essentials to Making Salad¬†in hopes you can make both without a recipe. Check it out and let us know your thoughts!

Looking for something to do this weekend? It’s time again for the Tastebuds Farm Tour from 10am-5pm. Stop by our farm, and lots of other amazing farms, and see exactly where your food is grown! We look forward to seeing you soon.

For those with a CSA share – next week you can expect pak choi, awesome Asian salad mix, and tender collards. We will have recipe ideas for you next week!

See you at market!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

September 16th Produce

Here are the items you can expect at Market (denoted by M) and/or in the CSA (denoted by CSA):

  • Summerfest Komatsuna {CSA}: this Asian green is a cousin of the turnip but with a more mild flavor. It is sometimes called Japanese Mustard Spinach. Cook these greens similar to other Asian greens – stir-fry, steam or add to soups. I think they would be a great addition to a miso soup (look for a recipe soon)!
  • Royal Radishes and Greens {M/CSA}: I made this recipe for Radish & Black Bean Salsa years ago when I first started volunteering for a farm in Cincinnati, OH. I was handing out samples at a CSA pickup and after one little boy tried it, he asked his mom to make it so he could eat it for lunch the next day! It was pretty wonderful, and so is the salsa.
  • Siberian Kale Mix {CSA}: you may be looking for something hearty now that there is a chill in the air. If so, give this Coconut Curried Kale and Sweet Potato dish a try.
  • Amara Mustard Greens {M/CSA}: Also called African Kale, these mustard greens are on the mild side. I think they would be great in our Greens & Cheese Frittata Muffins or in our Millet & Quinoa Patties!
  • India Mustard Greens {M/CSA}: these mustard greens are spicy and I think they would be great in a sauce. Try our Green Tahini Sauce or my recipe for Mustard Green Harissa.
  • Arugula {M}: so many wonderful ways to enjoy arugula – check out this post from The Kitchn for a little inspiration.
  • Hakurei Salad Turnips and Greens {M/CSA}: here is a simple farro salad recipe to use both your turnips and the greens. Simply add white beans or your favorite protein and dinner is ready!
  • Green Tomatoes and Red Cooking Tomatoes {CSA}: I know what I am doing with my green tomatoes – frying them! There are a million recipes for fried green tomatoes but this one is served with basil mayonnaise, so pick up some basil tomorrow too! And for the red cooking tomatoes, add them to Main Street Farmers Market recipe for West African Soup – yum!
  • Snap Green Beans {CSA}: you might as well enjoy basil now before it is gone – Green Bean Salad with Basil, Balsamic and Parmesan.
  • Basil {M}: I learned a great new technique last week to preserve basil. Take a stack of 10 or so leaves, place them in a pint sized canning jar, sprinkle with salt and olive oil, and repeat until jar is full. Drizzle stack with additional olive oil until basil is mostly covered (it will continue to compress – check it every day or so for a few days to make sure it is fully covered). They should keep in the refrigerator for months!
  • Eggs {M}: did you know unwashed, farm fresh eggs can last up to 3 months in the refrigerator?! Pick some up tomorrow and you will always have a meal options waiting for you.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Other :: Alice O’Dea Article

Have you read Alice O’Dea’s latest article? She is opening the door on one of my favorite things to make in the kitchen – sauces! So much to learn, so let’s do it together.


The Essential Elements to a Satisfying Salad

Hey!

Have you ever stopped to consider what makes a great salad? I am talking about salads you would eat as a meal and feel satisfied afterwards. I have been thinking of this lately as the “Fall into Greens” CSA is starting this week and we will soon have a lot more greens in our life (yay!). Let’s evaluate the Mango & Curried Chickpea Salad you see in the picture above in hopes you can make your own delicious salads without a recipe.

This salad is from one of my all time favorite cookbooks – Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi. It contains curry spiced chickpeas, blanched cauliflower, sauteed onion, fresh mangoes, hot green chile, cilantro, lime juice, and fresh baby spinach. Here is what I think makes this salad sound so amazing:

  • Both raw (spinach, mango) and cooked (cauliflower) textures
  • Hits on most of the 5 basic flavors – bitter¬†(curry spices),¬†sweet (mango), sour (lime juice), salty, umami
  • Ample amount of protein (chickpeas)
  • Cohesive dressing (here he just uses lime juice as there was enough oil used to prepare the other ingredients)

You can take this example and apply it to almost any salad you wish to prepare. Below I have listed different items you can use to achieve these fundamental elements.

  1. Raw Texture
    • Salad greens
      • Don’t limit salad greens to spinach/spring mix – add other raw greens such as kale, mustard, Swiss chard, arugula, radicchio
      • Toss fresh herbs in your green mix for another layer of flavor
    • Vegetables
      • I believe the vegetables listed below are great when added raw to a salad given they are¬†thinly sliced or chopped into bite-sized pieces.
        • ¬†Carrots
        • Radishes
        • Cabbage
        • Bell peppers
        • Cucumbers
        • Tomatoes
        • Fennel
        • Scallions
    • ¬†Fruit
      • Same goes with fruit – just make sure they are cut into bite sized pieces.
        • Apples
        • Pears
        • Citrus – oranges, grapefruit
        • Melon – cantaloupe, watermelon
        • Stone fruit – peaches, plums, cherries, apricots
        • Mango
        • Pineapple
        • Figs
        • Grapes
        • Berries – strawberries, blackberries, blueberries
  2. Cooked Texture
    1. Vegetables –¬†think of different ways to incorporate flavor into cooked vegetables – roasting, grilling, broiling, etc.
      • Potatoes
      • Sweet potatoes
      • Summer squash
      • Winter squash
      • Eggplant
      • Roasted red peppers
      • Broccoli
      • Cauliflower
      • Brussels sprouts
      • Beets
      • Asparagus
      • Artichokes
      • Green beans
      • Celery root
      • Corn
    2. Grains – cooked grains are a great way to add texture and extra nutrition – just make sure to use techniques that yield separate grains. Don’t forgot the taste and texture you can add with croutons and chips.
      • Quinoa
      • Barley
      • Rice
      • Hominy
      • Amaranth
      • Buckwheat
      • Teff
      • Wheat berries
      • Bread – croutons
      • Corn products – tortilla chips
    3. Protein (see section below)
  3. Savory Flavor (NOTE: I am combining umami, bitter and sour flavors in this section as there is a lot of crossover)
    • Vegetables
    • Meat / meat substitute
    • Mushrooms
    • Cheese
    • Olives
    • Capers
    • Sun-dried tomatoes
    • Miso
    • Tamarind
    • Wine
    • Citrus
  4. Sweet Flavor
    • Fruit – fresh, dried
    • Shredded coconut
    • Glazed nuts
    • Sweeteners added to your vinaigrette
      • Sugar – granulated, brown, coconut
      • Honey
      • Maple syrup
      • Sorghum
      • Jams and jelly
      • Sweet spices – cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, allspice
  5. Protein
    • I don’t know about you but I need protein in a salad to make it a meal. Of course you can use different types of meat or fish but there are plenty of vegetarian options too:
      • Beans – chickpeas, black beans, pinto
      • Lentils – French lentils hold their shape really well and are a great source of protein
      • Quinoa
      • Tofu – I am partial to fried tofu when used in a salad
      • Tempeh
      • Seitan
      • Edamame
      • Nuts – peanuts, walnuts, almonds, cashews, pistachios
      • Seeds – sesame, sunflower, poppy, hemp
      • Cheese – goat, cheddar, feta
      • Eggs – hardboiled
  6. Cohesive Dressing
    • ¬†Think of the dressing last as you can usually integrate flavors you may be missing elsewhere. For example, if you don’t have anything sweet in your salad, use a sweetened dressing. If you have a lot of cooked flavors, brighten up the salad with a more acidic dressing.
    • The ratio of 3 PARTS OIL to 1 PART ACID will give you a wonderful homemade dressing
      • Types of oil: olive oil, vegetable oil, hazelnut oil, walnut oil, sesame oil
      • Types of acid: white wine vinegar, red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar, sherry vinegar, rice vinegar, lemon juice, lime juice, orange juice
      • Add mustard, yogurt, pureed avocado, fruit juice, jelly, honey, herbs, etc to add body / interest
    • Here are some of my favorite dressings:
      • Mustard-balsamic vinaigrette
        • Add mustard, minced shallot and thyme to a basic oil/vinegar mixture
        • Can add a savory element when needed
      • Herb vinaigrette
        • Add minced fresh herbs of choice to a basic oil/vinegar mixture
        • Can add freshness when needed
      • Citrus vinaigrette
        • Add citrus juice and/or grated zest¬†in place of vinegar
        • Can add freshness and/or acidity when needed
      • Blue cheese dressing
        • Add creme fraiche and blue cheese crumbles
        • Can add richness to an otherwise lean salad

How do you make your salads satisfying? We would love to hear from you!


Charred Vegetable Stock

Hello,

The “Fall into Greens” CSA session starts next week and we couldn’t be more excited! We look forward to providing you and your loved ones with healthy, nutrient dense food. Contact us if you haven’t signed up yet!

We plan on making a lot more soup now that the weather will be cooling down a bit. One may think of ingredients first when building a soup but we suggest starting with the stock. A great stock is one of the most important (if not THE most important) elements to a great soup. Many think that a great stock means hours and hours of simmering on the stove but you can get great flavor with minimal ingredients in just over 30 minutes.

I made this stock for an egg drop soup but it can be altered in so many ways – use different vegetables (onion, leeks, carrots, fennel, etc), add whole spices (cinnamon sticks, coriander seeds, star anise, cumin seeds, whole cloves, etc), or char the vegetables on the grill instead of under the broiler (which would also give the stock a nice smoky flavor). Play around with it but I think you will agree that the small amount of time it takes will give you a big payoff in flavor.

Charred Vegetable Stock
makes 1 quart

Ingredients:

  • 3-1/4 ounces¬†scallions (white and light green parts only), from about 8 scallions
  • 2″ piece of fresh ginger, peeled and quartered
  • 3 large garlic cloves, peeled
  • 4-1/2 cups water (to account for water that evaporates so you are left with a quart of stock)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

  • Place oven rack in the middle-upper position and heat the broiler to high.
  • Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and evenly space scallions, ginger and garlic around the sheet. Place in oven and cook until first side is blackened, about 5 minutes (check every couple of minutes as broilers vary greatly). Remove from oven and flip everything over. Return to oven and cook until second side is blackened, about another 5 minutes.
  • Transfer cooked vegetables to a medium saucepan and add water. Bring to a boil, cover and reduce to a simmer. Cook for about 30 minutes. Strain the vegetables, pressing on the solids to extract as much flavor as possible. Once cool enough, taste and adjust seasoning as needed (I added soy sauce and some additional salt).