Easy White Bean and Kale Hummus

Hello!

I love hummus (I haven’t met many that don’t) so I am always looking for ways to make a great version at home. I have made really wonderful hummus from dried beans but it takes forethought and time, which doesn’t lend itself well to a quick, pull together meal. So I was really intrigued to find this version which cooks canned chickpeas in their canning liquid in the microwave. I really didn’t understand the science behind it but tried it anyways – turns out you can make really good hummus from canned beans! Someone commented on the original post with details on why this works:

“Chickpeas are high in a starch called amylose that forms large crystals as it cools after cooking, leading to a grainy texture. But exposure to high heat will break the crystals down. There’s no risk of the grainy texture recurring once the hummus is refrigerated, as the oil it contains will coat the individual amylose molecules, inhibiting crystallization. If your goal is to make the smoothest possible dip, then give your chickpeas a quick zap before pureeing.”

I am not sure if this holds true for cannellini beans too but I still followed the same procedure. If nothing else, it cooks the garlic at the same time, and I prefer the tamed down, cooked garlic flavor. I adjusted some of the other seasonings from the original posting – less tahini and more olive oil, lemon juice and salt. If you aren’t sure what you will like, just start with less and add more to taste.

I hope you enjoy this hummus as much as I have!

Easy White Bean and Kale Hummus
makes 2-3 cups

Recipe notes: 1) this recipe is also great with canned chickpeas; 2) I used 8 ounces of kale and it was more than I wanted to add to the hummus – but you may find you want to load it up, so add to your hearts desire!

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15-ounce) can of cannellini beans, NOT drained
  • 2 to 4 peeled garlic cloves, depending on how garlicky you like it
  • 1/3 cup tahini
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon table salt
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 to 8 ounces kale, de-stemmed and finely chopped
  • Roasted red peppers, sun-dried tomatoes or hot peppers for garnish

Directions:

  • Microwave undrained beans and whole garlic cloves in a mixing bowl for 4-5 minutes. Add to blender or food processor and process with lemon juice, salt and tahini. Stream in 1/4 cup olive oil while mixing. Process until smooth and creamy, scraping down sides as needed. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. You can eat it directly but I like it best after it has been refrigerated. It thickens up and the flavors meld.
  • When ready to serve, heat remaining olive oil in a 12″ skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Add the kale and cook, stirring often, until just cooked through, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and stir desired amount into the hummus. Serve with pita, crackers and/or cut up veggies.

 


Black Bean and Radish Green Dip

Hello,

Wondering what to do with your radish and salad turnip greens? This is a quick and easy recipe that will help you use your greens. You can definitely use other types of greens here but I love the extra spiciness that radish greens provide.

One note of caution – this dip is not pretty! It’s kind of a grey and army green color once it’s pureed, which doesn’t bother me, but I wouldn’t necessarily serve this at a dinner party 🙂 You could substitute the black beans for white beans and change up the spicing and it would probably be a bit more appetizing to the eye.

You can use this like you would hummus – use it as a dip for raw veggies or bread or as a smear on sandwiches or a veggie wrap. Play around and have fun!

Black Bean and Radish Green Dip
makes about 1-1/2 cups

Recipe notes: feel free to substitute other greens, such as kale, collards, or Swiss chard, for the radish / salad turnip greens.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 packed cup cooked radish / salad turnip greens (from about 8 large radishes / salad turnips)
  • 1/2 loosely packed cup cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Directions:

  • Place all ingredients in a large capacity food processor and process until a smooth paste forms, about 1 minutes, stopping to scrap down the sides as necessary. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.

Weekly Farm Notes :: August 11th, 2015

Hello!

I am including the same CSA information as I sent last week. Spots are filling up fast so please sign up soon if you are interested!

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We may be in the midst of summer heat but this is the BEST time to think about your Fall, Winter and Spring CSA! Not only can you secure your spot in, what is shaping up to be, our best season ever, but you can also help support our farm as we ramp up to provide you with healthy, delicious food.

You may be wondering how much variety there can be during the cooler months. While Mother Nature will partially dictate which of these products will make it to market, here is a list of seasonal produce you may see in your CSA share and at market: variety of cabbage, Chinese napa cabbage, bitter melon (NEW), variety of Pak choi, variety of kohlrabi, green onions, garlic, salad turnips, carrots, beets, variety of radish, salsify (NEW), rutabaga, arugula, spinach, variety of kale, Swiss chard, collard greens, broccoli raab, mustard greens, Asian greens, lettuce mix, variety of lettuce, pie pumpkin, winter squash, rampicante squash (NEW), potatoes, sweet potatoes, herbs, Jerusalem artichokes, chestnuts, and apples.

You can sign up by emailing us at food@tanthillfarm.com or stop by our booth at market tomorrow!

Let’s not lose sight of the current growing season, however. The list below includes items we will have available tomorrow. We hope to see you at market!

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August 12th Produce

Here are some of the items you can expect this week:

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Recipe :: Benedictine

I have only lived in the South since last November but I instantly fell in love with the food culture. I love reading about traditional Southern recipes and wanted to share this one which I just found in The Southern Foodways Alliance Community Cookbook. This spread, which would be great with our Diva cucumbers, is usually served in the form of finger sandwiches.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large cucumber, peeled, seeded and grated
  • 10 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons grated onion
  • Coarse sea salt
  • Ground black pepper

Directions:

  • Place the cucumber in a fine mesh sieve set over a bowl. Place in the refrigerator to drain for 2 hours. Transfer the cucumber into the bowl of a food processor and discard the collected liquid. Add the cream cheese and onion; pulse to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving lightly chilled.

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Other :: Alice O’Dea Article

Have you read Alice O’Dea’s latest article? I always appreciate an introduction to topics and dishes I have never heard of before. Thanks, Alice!


Black Bean & Carmen Pepper Burgers

Hello,

It’s summer and that means it’s time for burgers. I love traditional beef patties on occasion but I don’t eat meat often so I have been searching for an alternative. I have made plenty of veggie burgers in my day but not one version has been great. They usually have a long list of ingredients and/or the end result is nothing more than mush. I didn’t have high hopes but I was pleasantly surprised that the recipe below was fairly easy to put together, flavorful and had a great texture (it is adopted from The Complete Vegetarian Cookbook).

Don’t worry if you don’t have Carmen peppers – try roasted red peppers, cooked and chopped greens or shredded and sauteed summer squash or eggplant. Serve these with or without a bun, avocado and fresh tomatoes and enjoy!

Black Bean & Carmen Pepper Burgers
makes 6 burgers

Ingredients:

  • 8 Carmen peppers, stem removed, sliced in half lengthwise, seeds removed
  • 2 (15-ounce) cans black beans, rinsed
  • 2 large eggs
  • 5 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon groun cumin
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne (optional)
  • 1 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 1 tablespoon minced papalo
  • 1 shallot minced

Directions:

  • Adjust oven rack to highest position and heat broiler to high. Line rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and place sliced peppers cut side down. Broil until skins have blackened, 6-8 minutes, rotating sheet half-way through. Remove from oven and allow to cool. Once cool enough to handle, remove most of the skin, leaving some behind for a little extra flavor. Transfer peeled peppers to a cutting board and finely chop (you should have 1/2 cup).
  • Place 2 1/2 cups beans in a large bowl and mash with potato masher until mostly smooth. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, 1 tablespoon oil, cumin, salt and cayenne, if using. Stir egg mixture, remaining beans, panko, peppers, papalo and shallot into mashed beans until just combined. Divide mixture into 6 equal portions and lightly pack into 1-inch-thick patties.
  • Heat 2 tablespoons oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Carefully lay 3 patties in skillet and cook until well browned on both sides, 4-5 minutes per side.
  • Transfer burgers to plate and tent loosely with aluminum foil. Repeat with remaining 2 tablespoons oil and remaining patties. Serve.

Weekly Farm Notes :: June 2nd, 2015

Hello,

The Spring CSA ended last week but we will still have lots of goodies available tomorrow. See below for details on the produce you can expect. Also, I have included a recipe for Saffron Cauliflower and details on Yardlong Beans. Hope to see you at the market tomorrow!

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June 3rd Produce

Here are some of the items you can expect this week:

  • Tomatoes!: since the tomato season is just kicking off, I am going to suggest simply slicing your tomatoes, dousing them in your favorite extra-virgin olive oil and sprinkling with balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper. There are many weeks ahead of tomato dishes, why not just enjoy them raw?
  • Kohlrabi: here is an easy, flavorful way to enjoy kohlrabi: mix together 3 tablespoons sesame oil, 4 teaspoons white vinegar, 4 teaspoons soy sauce, 2-3 tablespoons sugar, 4 teaspoons sesame seeds (I like the black seeds because they stand out more). Then peel and slice kohlrabi thinly and marinate in the mixture.
  • Flat Head Cabbage: I guess it’s about time for grilling recipes! Check out this recipe for grilled cabbage with yogurt and mint. It’s a great way to use mint from the market too!
  • Cheddar Cauliflower: this version of cauliflower was first discovered in Canada in 1970, although it took years of crossbreeding before it was widely available. The color comes from a genetic mutation that allows the plant to hold more beta carotene. It also contains about 25% more vitamin A than white cauliflower (information from The Kitchn). Check out the recipe below if you need some inspiration!
  • Rainbow Chard: summer weather calls for raw salads. This Creamy Maple Mustard Raw Chard Salad sounds great!
  • Tender Collards: don’t forget, you can dehydrate your greens! Check out more here.
  • Toscano & Red Russian Kale: kale is a great in these Greens & Cheese Frittata Muffins!
  • Lemon Balm: have you ever tried a shrub? It’s a sweetened vinegary drink and it tastes amazing steeped with lemon balm! Check out our recipe here.
  • Mint: use your mint in the grilled cabbage recipe above!

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Recipe :: Saffron Cauliflower

This recipe comes from one of my favorite cookbooks, Plenty: Vibrant Vegetable Recipes from London’s Ottolenghi. It serves 4 as a side dish.

Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 teaspoons saffron
  • 1/3 cup boiling water
  • 1 medium head of cauliflower, divided into medium florets
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 2/3 cup golden raisins
  • 1/2 cup green olives, pitted and cut lengthwise in half
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 4 tablespoons roughly chopped parsley

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Put the saffron strands in a small bowl and pour over the boiling water. Leave to infuse for a minute, then pour the saffron and water into a large mixing bowl. Add the remaining ingredients, except the parsley, and mix well.
  • Transfer mixture to a medium ovenproof dish, cover with foil and place in the oven. Cook for 40-45 minutes, or until the cauliflower is tender but still a bit firm, not soft. Halfway through the cooking time remove the dish from the oven and stir well, then cover again and return to bake.
  • Once the cauliflower is cooked, take it out of the oven, remove the foil and allow to cool down slightly before stirring in the parsley. Taste and adjust seasoning, then serve warm or at room temperature.

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Summer Produce :: Yardlong Beans

Yardlong beans go by many names: bora, bodi, long-podded cowpea, asparagus bean, pea bean, snake bean, or Chinese long bean. Because it grows well is sub-tropical and tropical climates, it is typically found throughout Southeast Asian countries. Here are some interesting tidbits I discovered in my research:

  • Yardlong beans become waterlogged when cooked steamed or boiled so are best cooked with oil
  • Although the beans can grow to be 3 feet long, optimal picking is between 12-18″
  • They are a good source of protein, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, iron, phosphorus, and potassium, and a very good source for vitamin C, folate, magnesium, and manganese
  • I have found references to canning and fermenting these beans so I plan on trying both this summer!

Weekly Farm Notes :: May 19th, 2015

Hello,

Now that we are close to the end of the Spring CSA, we wanted to give you a heads up on what to expect from us this summer. To start, we will have lots of beans! The list includes green beans, yard long beans, Crowder peas, Italian beans, October beans, and half white runners. To give you some insight into each variety, we will highlight a different bean each week. Up this week: Crowder peas! Check out the details below.

Hope to see you at the market tomorrow!

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May 20th Produce

Here are some of the items you can expect this week:

  • Kohlrabi: I have been daydreaming of kohlrabi fritters lately. You too? This recipe looks like a great place to start.
  • Beets: you HAVE to try roasting beets and combining them with kalamata olives, orange and goat cheese. It is one of the best flavor combinations I have ever tried. It’s great on a sandwich or as a salad. I wrote about it here – give it a try and let us know what you think!
  • Green Leaf Lettuce: the lettuce this week has turned a little bitter so we wanted to provide a salad dressing recipe that would stand up to it. See below!
  • Salad Turnips: I have loved adding these raw to my sandwiches this week. Today I sliced these thinly and added them to a sandwich with hard boiled eggs, avocado and Sriracha. Talk about good food, fast!
  • Tender Collards: don’t forget, you can dehydrate your greens! Check out more here.
  • Toscano & Beira Kale: I really love these little baked quinoa and kale bites. I have a feeling you will too.
  • Napa Chinese Cabbage: I posted this recipe last week for spicy raw pak choi but I think it would be equally as good with this cabbage. I served it along side a ramen noodle soup and it was perfect.

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Recipe :: Sesame-Miso Dressing

This recipe is from Cook’s Illustrated and will coat 10 cups of washed and dried salad greens.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons white miso
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted and crushed
  • 1 scallion, sliced thin

Directions:

  • Whisk together miso, honey, soy sauce, and water in medium bowl; gradually whisk in peanut oil, then stir in sesame seeds and scallion.

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Summer Produce :: Crowder Peas

I had never heard of crowder peas so thought we would start here. Below are a few interesting tidbits I found on this site. I am really looking forward to trying these this summer!

  • The crowder pea variety gets its name from the way its peas crowd themselves in the pod.
  • Blackeye peas, crowder peas, field peas, and Lady Cream peas are varieties of the same species commonly called “cowpeas” or “Southern peas”.
  • It has a rich, hearty flavor and creates a dark pot liquor when cooked.
  • 1 cup (172 grams) of cooked crowder peas has only 200 calories, very little fat and 45% RDA of fiber.

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Other News

Have you read Alice O’Dea’s latest article? Check out her latest article on shrubs (which featured our recipe!).


Collard Green Falafel

I absolutely love falafel. I could eat it every day and be a very happy person. Especially when there’s hummus, pita and olives served along side. But to make authentic falafel, one needs to start with dried chickpeas (something I don’t always have on hand) and remember to soak them overnight (which I rarely remember to do). You don’t actually cook the beans when falafel are made this way which ensures a nice dense texture. While the recipe below yields falafel that are a little softer than the traditional version, they are a great, quick alternative.

The recipe below was adapted from The Minimalist Baker. They are all about simple recipes that can be made with 10 ingredients or less. Check out their blog if that type of cooking is up your alley!

Collard Green Falafel
makes about 25 1.5″ patties

Recipe note: I made a batch of these with almost twice the amount of collards (7.5 ounces/4 cups). I had to add more flour to keep them together and then cook them longer, but if you want to pack in more greens, it’s an option!

  • 4 ounces collard greens, stemmed and roughly chopped into 2″ pieces (about 2.5 cups) (see recipe note)
  • 1 (15-oz) can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, minced (about a teaspoon), or more if desired
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon table salt
  • 5 grinds fresh black pepper
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup olive or vegetable oil

Directions:

  • Add all ingredients except the flour and oil to a large food processor and pulse to combine. I like to keep just a little texture in the beans if possible and not completely puree everything, so just keep pulsing, stopping to scrape down the bowl when needed, until you get the right consistency. Taste and add more seasoning (salt, cumin, garlic) if desired.
  • Transfer mixture to a medium mixing bowl and add 3 tablespoons of flour to start. Mix to combine and add the extra tablespoon of flour if the mixture doesn’t stay together when you clump a little up in your hand.
  • Portion out 1 heaping tablespoon of the mixture onto a rimmed baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. Form into a 1-1/2″ wide by 1/2″ tall disk. Continue until you have used up the remaining mixture. Set aside.
  • Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a 12″ skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Transfer roughly 12 disks to the oil, making sure not to crowd the pan. Cook until brown and crisp on the first side, about 5 minutes, then flip and cook another 5 minutes on the second side. You may need to add just a little more oil to the pan after flipping in order to get the second side crisp. Once cooked, transfer to a paper towel lined plate to drain. Repeat with remaining oil and mixture. The falafel will firm up a bit when allowed to cool. Serve and enjoy.

Healthy Chickpea Snacks (Alice O’Dea Article)

Hello!

We wanted to share yet another great article from a Tant Hill CSA member, Alice O’Dea. This week, she is exploring the wonderful world of roasted chickpeas. Simple, healthy and affordable – it’s just the thing to make along with all of the wonderful greens you are getting right now. You can read the article here but I have also posted the text below. We hope you enjoy!

Well, we made it to March, folks. And we’ve reached that sweet spot in the year where a few of us have not yet abandoned our New Year’s resolutions, others are enduring Lenten sacrifices and the (very brief) spring preview we enjoyed this past week has some people already thinking about getting shaped up for summer togs.

If you fall into any of those categories, I’ve got a snack for you! It’s high in protein, low in fat, packed with nutrients and fiber; and it’s gluten-, nut-, soy-, sugar- and grain-free! It also can be packed with as much flavor as you’re willing to give it.

I’m talking about roasted chickpeas. This is a really cheap and easy treat to make at home. All you need are some chickpeas (dried or canned), a bit of oil, and some optional seasonings and spices. The prep takes just moments, and the rest is just baking time. When you’re done, you’ll have a snack or garnish that can add protein to your diet and keep you feeling sated for hours.

Start with the chickpeas. If you’re using the dried variety, you’ll have tocook them (or if you put in a little extra the last time you made a batch, pull them out of the freezer). If you’re using canned chickpeas, drain and rinse them.

Either way, you don’t want the chickpeas to be at all damp, so dry them in some fashion. Some options are to run them through a salad spinner, blot them between towels, or—if you’re one of the few people who thinks ahead—put them on a baking pan and let them sit in a cold oven overnight.

I consulted almost 20 recipes for roasted chickpeas, and all but one of them called for roasting them in a oven that is anywhere from 375 to 450 degrees (the lone maverick suggested skillet roasting them in some oil on the stovetop over medium-high heat for about 20 minutes). If you pick the middle ground, that will put your oven at somewhere around 400–425 degrees.

While the oven is heating, mix up whatever flavors you want for your beans. There is a lot of room for improvisation here. You can shoot for a total of about a tablespoon of spices per can of beans (which is equivalent to about one and a half cups of cooked chickpeas). Use a combination of powdered cumin, chilies, coriander, ginger, cayenne pepper, garlic, onion, paprika, cinnamon, curry, turmeric, allspice or garam masala. Other things you might want to include are crushed toasted nuts or seeds, nutritional yeast, or ground herbs (such as rosemary, thyme, marjoram or sage). Some recipes I looked at also called for adding a few squirts of liquid ingredients such as maple syrup, soy sauce, tamari, liquid aminos, liquid smoke, or lemon juice and/or zest.

Mix your seasonings in a bowl, add the chickpeas, and then drizzle them with up to a tablespoon of oil per can of beans. Stir everything together until the chickpeas are coated, season with salt and pepper if you like, and spread the chickpeas out on a baking sheet. Bake until done, which should take anywhere from 25 to 45 minutes. Stir the chickpeas around a little bit every 10 or 15 minutes so they cook evenly, and also to check for doneness. You want them to be crisp and golden. With so many variables at work, your cooking time will probably vary from batch to batch, so keep a close eye on them. I made two versions this week: one with canned chickpeas and another with some that I’d pulled out of the freezer. The canned ones cooked quicker, but the ones I cooked from dried beans ended up being a little lighter and crunchier.

With so many possible combinations of flavors, this is a treat that can hold up to numerous reruns without ever getting tiresome. Enjoy!