Quick Pickled Green Onions

Hi!

I love fresh green onions but sometimes I can’t get through a whole bunch before they go bad. This recipe is the perfect solution – it’s quick, easy and adds an extra punch of flavor. You can leave out the ginger and red pepper flakes and replace it with any herbs or spices you like.

This will be great with any number of dishes. Slice them thinly and add to eggs, rice or noodle dishes. Keep them whole and tuck them into a sandwich or serve along side a piece of fish.

This recipe is adapted from The Joy of Pickling, which I highly recommend if you are a pickle fanatic (and if you are, join the club!).

Enjoy!

Quick Pickled Green Onions
makes 1 pint

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup white distilled vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1/2″ piece fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper flakes
  • 2 bunches scallions, trimmed, light and green parts only

Directions:

  • Put the vinegar, water, sugar, salt, ginger and hot pepper flakes in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. While the mixture heats, pack the green onions into a wide mouth glass pint jar; I like to arrange them vertically.
  • Once the vinegar mixture comes to a boil, remove from heat and pour over the scallions. Cover jar tightly with a nonreactive cap and allow to cool to room temperature. Transfer to the refrigerator.
  • The green onions should be ready to eat in a week and should keep for several months.

Easiest Refrigerator Pickles

Hello!

We are moving into our new house this week (yay!) so I have very limited time in the kitchen. I remembered Smitten Kitchen’s Easiest Fridge Dill Pickle recipe when I was trying to decide what to do with cucumbers, and I am so glad I did! This recipe couldn’t be easier or more delicious and it is perfect with our Diva cucumbers. I adjusted the recipe slightly by using a different type of vinegar and swapping out the dill for a dried spice blend. This is a recipe I will make again and again and we hope you like it too!

Easiest Refrigerator Pickles
makes 3-4 cups of pickles + brine

Recipe notes: 1) although not necessary, a mandoline makes slicing the cucumbers a quick and painless process; 2) I used 3 teaspoons of salt as I like my pickles salty – reduce amount to 2 teaspoons if you are sensitive to salt; 3) you can use different types of vinegar (white wine, distilled, etc) but I prefer rice vinegar as it has the lowest acidity level and doesn’t leave the pickles with a sharp bite.

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds (about 3 medium) cucumbers, sliced very thin (I used the 3mm setting on my mandoline, which is about .12 inches)
  • 2-3 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup rice vinegar
  • A tablespoon or two of chopped dill or other seasonings as desired (I used 1 teaspoon of Penzey’s Greek Seasoning which contains oregano, garlic, lemon, black pepper and marjoram and I LOVED the flavor!)

Directions:

  • In a large mixing bowl, toss cucumbers, salt, vinegar and herbs/seasoning, if using, together until well combined. Note: the liquid will NOT cover the pickles, and that is ok. The salt will begin to draw water out of the cucumbers and soon there will be plenty of liquid. Set aside for an hour. Transfer to an air tight container and refrigerate. The pickles will keep for a couple of weeks, but come on, they won’t last that long!

Preserve the Harvest :: Quick Pickled Radish Leaves

Making quick pickles is one of the fastest and easiest ways to preserve the harvest. These types of pickles are made by pouring an acidic brine over produce, allowing the brine to flavor the vegetable or fruit over a number of days in the refrigerator. Although they are called quick “pickles” it is important to understand a few important ways in which they differ from fermented pickles.

  • Time: quick pickles are ready in a matter of hours or days whereas fermented pickles take weeks or even months.
  • Flavor development: quick pickles get their flavor from the acidic brine and any flavoring components whereas fermented pickles get flavor from bacteria present during the fermentation process. Fermented pickles tend to have a more complex and developed flavor but you have more control over the final flavor with quick pickles.
  • Refrigeration: quick pickles have to be refrigerated and typically last only a few weeks, unlike fermented pickles which have a much longer shelf life.

Quick pickling is pretty foolproof but here are a few tips to get you started:

  • Vinegar/Water Ratio: I suggest starting with equal parts vinegar to water to see how you like the balance of flavor. You can always adjust it during the next batch. To determine the amount of brine needed, just measure the amount that will fit in the jar you intend to use.
  • Types of Vinegar: I wouldn’t use balsamic vinegar but just about anything else goes – apple cider vinegar, rice vinegar, white wine vinegar, red wine vinegar, distilled white vinegar. I like to use rice vinegar because it’s has the lowest acidity level (~4%) of those I mentioned above (wine vinegars are around 7%) so the flavor of the vegetables and spices can shine through a bit more.
  • Flavorings: Whole spices and crushed garlic are great places to start when deciding how to flavor your brine. I prefer to keep the spicing relatively mild so I can use my pickles on just about anything. Mustard seeds, bay leaves and peppercorns are classic but don’t stop there. I have added cumin seeds, fennel seeds, allspice, cinnamon sticks, cloves and dried hot chiles to batches in the past.
  • Sugar: a lot of recipes I find include sugar – and some of them have A LOT! I don’t find that I need sugar because I use rice vinegar. If you are using a vinegar with a higher acidity level (see Types of Vinegar section above) then you might want to add a tablespoon or two to help balance the flavor.
  • Vegetables: some vegetables, like greens, thinly sliced onions or thinly sliced cucumbers don’t need to be pre-cooked. Just pour the hot brine over the vegetables and you are set. Others, like carrots or beets, need to be cooked a little beforehand to ensure they aren’t too crunchy.
  • Time: the amount of time you let the vegetables sit in the brine is completely up to your taste buds. I recommend trying them every day to see how they change.

Below is a rough outline of what I used to preserve the radish leaves from last week’s CSA share. We look forward to hearing your quick pickle recipes!

Quick Pickled Radish Leaves

Ingredients:

  • 1 large bunch radish leaves, trimmed, washed and sliced into 1″ strips
  • 1-1/2 cups rice vinegar
  • 1-1/2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 2 large garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
  • 1 teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • A few allspice berries
  • A few dried hot peppers

Directions:

  • Place radish leaves in a quart sized glass canning jar and set aside.
  • Place the remaining ingredients in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Remove from heat and carefully pour brine and spices over the radish leaves. Set aside and allow to cool to room temperature. Place in the refrigerator and use within 2-3 weeks.